Palm at OSCON

1 BY devrel

Palm will be at OSCON next week in Portland. Josh Marinacci will be joining the rest of the HP crew in the HP booth, demonstrating Ares and webOS. He will also be giving away T-shirts, books, super nice water bottles, and you’ll even have a chance to win some phones! Here’s the full schedule of webOS related events during OSCON.

(BTW, even if you aren’t attending all of OSCON you can come see us in the Expo Hall for free!)

  • Tuesday 6:00PM: Introduction to the Mobile Web


    Portland Java User’s Group

    (not part of OSCON. it’s free!)

    Oracle Building, 8th Floor room 8005

    Pacwest Center,

    1211 SW 5th Avenue

    Portland, Oregon
  • Wednesday: 10:40AM HP’s Session: Cloudy with a Chance of Revolution

    This is an overview of where HP is going in the cloud, including a section on webOS and Ares.
  • Wednesday and Thursday: HP Booth

    Palm will be in the HP Booth demoing Ares and giving away great stuff. You will also learn about how you can win a webOS developer phone.

Though not Palm related, Josh will be doing a session on marketing your open source project with zero budget. It’ll be tons of fun!

Two videos to watch

0 BY devrel

I thought I’d pass along pointers to a couple of videos you might want to watch.

The first one is to the Engadget Show, where Palm’s CEO, Jon Rubenstein, sits down for a talk about Palm, the Pre  and webOS.

The other video is the second webcast by Palm’s CTO Mitch Allen, this one covering webOS Application basics:

For those getting started programming in webOS, it covers a lot of the ground to get you going and is well worth the time to view.

Sharing Q&A from Application Basics Talk

1 BY devrel

Just a quick note to thank everyone who attended the Application Basics webcast on Tuesday (September 9th), and to thank the O’Reilly team for hosting the webcast. We covered a lot in the hour ranging from how to access and install the SDK, an overview of the SDK tools and building a simple application. The webcast was recorded and has been posted by O’Reilly.

This webcast was based on Chapter 2 of the Palm webOS book, which was released last month and is now available on O’Reilly’s website as well as Amazon, Barnes & Nobles and other sources for technical books. We haven’t scheduled any other webcasts at this time but we are interested in doing more on topics that most interest you. There could be some based on other chapters of the book or just on some specific webOS topics – let us know what you’d like to see.

Also a thanks to the readers who have taken time to email or submit comments and corrections to the book. We rushed to get the book into print and available as close to the SDK release as we could, but in doing so we missed a number of problems in the sample code and in the book copy. Those are all being corrected in a second printing of the book which O’Reilly is working on now and once available, there will be a simple change summary provided on the webOS book’s page on O’Reilly’s site.

I had a lot of great questions in the Q&A period, so I wanted to share them with other developers who may have similar queries:

Application Basics – Webcast Q&A

Q: How do I get access to the shipping applications, on the emulator?

Most of the Palm applications included on end-user devices are accessible from the emulator as well, and may be run from the webOS Launcher, just like on a real device. Because the emulator doesn’t currently support all device functionality, some apps (particularly the media apps) are not fully functional in the emulator. You can access application code by connecting to the emulator via Novaterm or SSH and browsing to /usr/palm/applications.

Note that carrier-specific applications (e.g. Sprint Navigation) are not available in the emulator. Nor is the App Catalog, so third-party apps cannot be installed from the catalog. Of course, you can use the SDK’s command-line tools to install any app for which you have source code or a package file (.ipkg), including your own applications and the SDK sample apps.

Q: Besides the emulator, what tools are there to test a webOS app?

The Mojo SDK includes a variety of tools that complement the emulator, including a terminal-based JavaScript debugger, a DOM inspector, and tools for viewing application log output. The SDK’s command-line tools can be used to install apps on physical devices as well, for real-world testing. Third-party tools are emerging as well – for example, Pivotal Labs has developed a library called Pockets for doing test-driven development for webOS. Pockets includes a version of the Jasmine test framework and is available from their gitHub repository.

Q: Are there plans to release additional tools for creating apps without using the command line?

Yes, we believe that it’s very important to have high level tools and are actively working on solutions. We don’t currently have any specifics to announce, but it’s a high priority for the SDK team. For now, besides Palm’s own Eclipse plug-in, a number of third-party tools integrations exist — check the webOSdev forums for more information.

Q: When will the 1.2 SDK be available?

The 1.2 SDK will be released as soon as webOS 1.2 itself is released.

Q: Can we use jQuery or other libraries?

Yes, you can use other JavaScript libraries and frameworks like jQuery. In some cases, however, there may be some constraints, or issues affecting interoperability with the Mojo framework and Prototype (on which the Mojo framework depends). This topic has been discussed in the webOSdev forums for some frameworks, including jQuery.

Q: When will the SDK support 64-bit Windows?

The latest SDK release (1.1.0.19) supports 64-bit Windows. However, note that this release contains an installer bug that affects upgrades. If you’re a new user, the 1.1.0.19 SDK will install correctly on 64-bit Windows. If you’re upgrading from an older version of the SDK, you’ll need to uninstall the old version before installing 1.1.0.19. This bug will be fixed in the next SDK release.

Do you have more questions? Join us on the developer  forum and ask away!

(posting this for Mitch — chuq)

Chapters Four and Five of Developing Applications in JavaScript using the Palm Mojo™ Framework now available

13 BY devrel

The fourth and fifth chapter of the Rough Cuts version of Palm webOS: Developing Applications in JavaScript using the Palm Mojo™ Framework by Palm Software CTO Mitch Allen is now available from O’Reilly.

Chapter four is “Dialogs and Menus” while chapter five covers “Advanced Widgets”.

Please visit Safari Books Online to download this chapter.

Topics  O'Reilly

Chapter Three of Developing Applications in JavaScript using the Palm Mojo™ Framework now available

5 BY devrel

The third chapter of the Rough Cuts version of Palm webOS: Developing Applications in JavaScript using the Palm Mojo™ Framework by Palm Software CTO Mitch Allen is now available from O’Reilly.

This chapter is titled “Widgets”. Widgets are dynamic UI controls, that can be integrated within any application. They can be tailored to the application, yet provide reusable, stylistically consistent UI functions. Widgets is a term widely used within web development but Mojo widgets are different than other widgets. Mojo widgets have a defined behavior but with many options; they generate complex HTML and are easily styled with CSS.

Please visit Safari Books Online to download this chapter.

Topics  O'Reilly

Chapter two of Developing Applications in JavaScript using the Palm Mojo™ Framework now available

3 BY devrel

The second chapter of the Rough Cuts version of Palm webOS: Developing Applications in JavaScript using the Palm Mojo™ Framework by Palm Software CTO Mitch Allen is now available from O’Reilly.

This chapter is titled “Application Basics” and shows the reader how to create their first application and discusses many of the underlying philosophies of programming in Mojo and webOS. This chapter includes the material on which Mitch’s recent O’Reilly webinar was based, but goes into more detail and shows more of the coding details of programming a webOS application.

If you’re new to JavaScript, HTML or CSS, you may want to familiarize yourself with their fundamentals before tackling the next few chapters. Even so, the material presented here is fairly basic and you don’t need to be a web development expert to build applications for webOS.

In this chapter, you’ll learn how to build a basic webOS application starting with the installation of the SDK. You’ll create a new application project, customize the critical application components and develop the first parts of the News application, which will be used throughout the book as our sample app. Along the way, we will go into detail on how to use the framework and apply the different APIs, widgets and styles.

This is only available from O’Reilly for those users who have purchased access to the title. Please visit  Safari Books Online to download this chapter.

Topics  O'Reilly

Developing Applications for WebOS slides

7 BY devrel

We had a few requests for the slides to the Developing Applications for WebOS webcast. I’ve uploaded them to Slideshare, and they’re now available for those that wanted them.

Now Available — Developing Applications for webOS webcast

22 BY devrel

I’m happy to announce that the Developing Applications for webOS webcast is now available from O’Reilly for online viewing.

You can view this either from O’Reilly’s webcast page or from their YouTube channel.

If you weren’t able to see the webcast list, now’s a great time to go and take a look.

If you have questions about developing on the Palm webOS that weren’t answered during the webinar, please leave a comment here and ask them. We might not be able to answer every question right away (for instance, we know you’re going to ask “When?” and “How much?” and we can’t answer those questions yet) — but we will answer as many as we can, and keep track of the rest and answer them later.

Also, we’d love to hear what you thought about the webinar. Please post a comment here telling us what you thought liked about it, and tell us how we could make it better next time. Your feedback will help make future events better!

The first round of answers to your webinar questions

0 BY devrel

A couple of days ago we asked for your feedback and questions on the Webinar, and we got a lot of both! Thank you all, and keep it coming!

Here’s the first set of answers to some of the questions that were asked. We’re still working on answering more of them, so stay tuned.

First, we had a lot of questions on the documentation, when it’ll be available, and what will be in it. The documentation will be available at the same time as the SDK. We decided to release the rough cuts chapter and hold the webinar to provide a preview to the sdk but there are no plans currently to release more information ahead of the sdk.

Q:  I was hoping to get clarification on a passage in the first chapter of the book about uninstalling applications,

This includes removing it from the launcher and any local application data, plus any data added to the Palm application databases such as Contacts or Calendar data.

A: Yes, that was unclear and we’re working on revising it. The current draft of the revision is:

The user can opt to remove an application and its data from the device. When the user attempts to delete an application, the system will stop the application if needed and remove its components from the device. This includes removing it from the launcher and any local application data, plus any data that the application might have created in the Palm application databases such as added Contacts or Calendar records.

Q: Will the (HTML/Javascript/noncompiledwhatever) source code for all client-side applications be available for any device owner to see?

A: Mitch discussd this during the Q&A of the webinar and we don’t have anything more to add at this time.

Q: It would be great if webOS had some sort of certificate check when trying to install app and warn the user if it is not certified but still leave it up to the user to install it. This way you would have a sort of disclaimer that proceeding with non-certified apps is at users’ risk but at the same time allow in-house and experimental/beta development, test and distribution
of the apps. This will also allow third parties to promote their apps directly.

A: Applications installed on a webOS device will be signed with a digital certificate that will identify it and its publisher. The details of this program are not final and we’ll go into more detail on the process at a later date.

Q: Should we have a business (with an ID number) for selling applications on your Applications Store? Or will be freelancing is enough? I need to know if I should open a business now?

A: We are not ready to disclose the business elements of the application catalog, and these may vary by geography and over time.

Q: The SDK (especially the emulator) will run on what OS? Mac? Windows? Linux?

A: The development environment will run on MacOS, Windows and Linux.

Q:  I love jQuery. Please let us know if it’ll work.

A:  jQuery should work fine. We’re still evaluating which libraries and framework will be formally tested with webOS, and once that’s final we’ll document that.

Q: What localization support is built into the OS? will there be built-in support for BiDi (RTL) languages such as Hebrew, Arabic ?

A: WebOS has internationalization and localization support but beyond that we are not yet announcing when specific languages or locales will be supported.

Thanks for helping make our Webinar a success!

35 BY devrel

We wanted to send a quick note out and thank everyone who registered for and attended today’s Webinar on Developing Applications for webOS. We are thrilled so many of you wanted to attend, and O’Reilly has told us we are the largest Webinar put on by them to date.

For those who couldn’t see the webinar live, it was recorded and we will post information about how to view it here on PDNBlog as soon as it’s ready.

If you have questions about developing on the Palm webOS that weren’t answered during the webinar, please leave a comment here and ask them. We might not be able to answer every question right away (for instance, we know you’re going to ask “When?” and “How much?” and we can’t answer those questions yet) — but we will answer as many as we can, and keep track of the rest and answer them later.

Also, we’d love to hear what you thought about the webinar. Please post a comment here telling us what you thought liked about it, and tell us how we could make it better next time. Your participation helped make this a great event, and your feedback will help make future events better!

Thanks!

The webOS Development Team

Topics  O'Reilly